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PORTABILITY: Use of Historical Performance at a Predecessor Firm

By James E. Grand, The Securities Law Group (Guest Contributor),
Thursday, August 25th, 2016

The following article was written and contributed by James E. Grand, Esq. of The Securities Law Group, a specialized boutique law firm dedicated exclusively to representing investment advisers.

We are often asked by advisers who are switching firms whether they can use in their own performance presentation or the predecessor firm’s performance record at their new firm. There are two separate questions here: First; if Jill Doe moves from one firm to another, can Jill use her own performance record while she worked at the old firm in the new firm’s advertising? Second, can Jill use the old firm’s overall performance record in the new firm’s advertising?

A number of SEC staff no-action letters address these questions. These no-action letters generally take the position that an advertisement that includes prior performance of accounts managed by advisors at their prior place of employment will not, in and of itself, be deemed to be misleading so long as:

1. The advertisement is consistent with SEC staff interpretations with respect to the advertisement of performance results.

2. All accounts that were managed in a substantially similar manner are advertised unless the exclusion of any account would not result in materially higher performance. For example, in one case we know of the SEC allowed a newly registered adviser solely owned by an employee to use performance data of several accounts managed by the employee prior to registration. In other words, Jill could advertise the performance of some but not all of her prior client accounts so long as such performance is not materially higher than her accounts’ overall performance.

3. The accounts managed at the old firm are so similar to the accounts currently under management at the new firm that the performance record would provide relevant information to prospective clients.

4. The person(s) managing accounts at the new firm are also those primarily responsible for achieving the prior performance results at old firm. In other words, the individual(s) primarily responsible for achieving the prior performance results must also be the individual(s) primarily responsible for the accounts at the new firm. To put in another way, it would be misleading for an adviser to advertise the performance results of accounts managed at her prior place of employment when she was one of several persons responsible for selecting the securities for the adviser’s clients. The question is whether she was actually responsible for making investment decisions without the need for consensus from other advisers (e.g., an investment committee, etc.).

5. The advertisement includes all relevant disclosures, including that the performance results were from accounts managed at another firm.

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund  Hedge Fund Insiders  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Trends We're Seeing 

Thriving in the Hedge Fund Startup Market: Three Considerations for Emerging Managers

By Katie Sloane,
Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

It’s no surprise that starting a hedge fund is no easy feat. In an increasingly competitive landscape challenged with evolving investor and regulatory demands, progressive technology and mounting cyber threats, emerging managers can become overwhelmed at the winding path that lay before them. Still, hundreds of emerging managers attempt launching every year due to the prospective monetary and fundamental rewards.

What sets apart successful startups from those that fail? In today’s post we will cover a few essential areas startupreneurs should consider during their launch journey.

Invest in People

Your greatest assets walk out of the door every day: Your team. Every hedge fund startup is backed by people, and the more dynamic and versatile this team is, the greater chance the firm has of achieving and sustaining a successful future. Why? Since capital is limited during the development phase, selecting people with skill sets in multiple arears is essential. Additionally, employees are ambassadors for your firm, and thus, critical to attracting investors.

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing 

Business Continuity Tip for Investment Management: Communication is Vital

By Eze Castle Integration,
Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

There's a lot to learn about business continuity planning for investment managers. To help, you might want to watch our recent webinar highlighting the SEC's June 2016 business continuity guidance update. You can watch the full webinar replay here. The SEC not only highlights the importance of being able to access critical systems and applications during a disruption, but also the importance of effective communication. 

Employee communication during a disaster is keyIt is vital to communicate with your employees about the procedures of your business continuity plan before, during and after an incident. By doing so, you set the wheels in motion by creating the guidelines for the firm’s recovery.

Effective communication should include, but not be limited to:

  1. Accounting for employees;

  2. Setting workload expectations; and

  3. Providing employees with recovery status updates.

Let’s take a deeper look into those strategies.

Categorized under: Business Continuity Planning  Launching A Hedge Fund  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing 

Employee Termination Checklist for IT: An Investment Firm’s Starting Place

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Whether it is your summer interns heading back to school or a full-time employee moving on, an investment firm must have a detailed employee termination checklist for information technology (IT) that is diligently followed.

But what are the key items that must be on your employee termination checklist?

Here’s An Employee Termination Checklist Foundation:

  • Contact IT Department or IT Provider to terminate or change network or application logins 

  • Ensure subscriptions are either cancelled or changed

  • Collect employee equipment such as laptops, monitors, mobile devices, etc.

  • Ensure employee has documented transition procedures

  • Reset user password and disabled account

Categorized under: Security  Launching A Hedge Fund  Hedge Fund Operations  Business Continuity Planning 

For start-ups: Four pillars of cyber security defence

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, July 14th, 2016

The following article was written by Dean Hill, Executive Director, Eze Castle Integration and first appeared on Hedgeweek as part of their special report: A Guide to Setting up an Alternative Investment Fund in Europe. 
Dean Hill, Eze Castle Integration

There is no shortage of threats to financial services firms, and the list of requirements from investors and regulators alike is growing at a rapid pace. As a startup, it's important to demonstrate to investors that you take your business seriously, hence, investments in operational excellence are required. On the cybersecurity front, that means leveraging technology infrastructure with robust, security-rich features including intrusion detection and ongoing traffic monitoring, regular vulnerability assessments and next-generation software, firewalls and patches to keep hackers out and firm assets secure.

But beyond technology safeguards, today's successful financial firms require the wherewithal to implement comprehensive cybersecurity programmes – whether you're a seasoned firm or embarking on your first investment venture. The most effective cyber programmes will focus on four critical administrative areas: (1) developing comprehensive security policies and plans to prevent external cyber-attacks or internal breaches, (2) training firm employees on said policies and current cyber threats, (3) cultivating a culture of security awareness from Management down, and (4) managing an effective risk programme via external vendor oversight. 

Plan: True cybersecurity defence starts with proper planning. To start, funds need to develop written information security plans – comprehensive documentation of the firm's corporate security initiatives. This should include technical and administrative safeguards being employed to secure confidential data. In the development stage, firms will need to identify systems and plans currently being used, technical procedures and systems in effect, employee access controls relative to confidential data as well as user responsibilities for both prior to and in the event of a data breach. 

Categorized under: Security  Launching A Hedge Fund  Private Equity  Hedge Fund Operations  Outsourcing  Infrastructure  Trends We're Seeing 

A Look at the FCA's IT Outsourcing Guidance for Financial Services Firms

By Zorela Georgescu,
Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Financial services firms are increasingly interested relying on third-party service providers to increase efficiencies and benefit from industry expertise. While outsourcing has grown, however, regulatory bodies such as the Securities & Exchange Commission (US) and Financial Conduct Authority (UK) have begun to evaluate outsourced relationship and provide guidance around how investment management firms should engage and manage these partnerships. In 2015, the FCA drafted a “guidance for firms outsourcing to the ‘cloud’ and other third party services.”

The document aims to ensure that risks associated with outsourcing are appropriately identified and managed.  Thirteen key areas of consideration are highlighted below.

  1. Legal and Regulatory Considerations. In undertaking the due diligence process, an investment firm should consider and compare operational risks associated with outsourcing to various providers (e.g. public vs private cloud) as well as any specific legal or regulatory obligations. Firms should identify and record contracts with all service providers, ensuring that compliance with any relevant requirements lives throughout the supply chain.

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund  Cloud Computing  Hedge Fund Regulation 

Grading your cloud provider: four critical criteria

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, May 19th, 2016

This article was written by Bob Guilbert, Managing Director, and first appeared in Hedgeweek's 2016 Guide to Setting Up an Alternative Investment Fund in the USA. Bob Guilbert, Eze Castle Integration

You're a new fund manager, and somewhere on your task list the letters "IT" are probably followed by a question mark. Odds are, you don't have a technology background, so as your firm's Chief Operating/Financial/Compliance Officer (or in some cases, Portfolio Manager), the sudden responsibility you've undertaken as your firm's de facto IT Manager is intimidating at best. 

The good news is, as a startup, your IT options are pretty clear. In 2016, there's no better technology decision a new firm can make than selecting a cloud platform – an infrastructure that has proven benefits including scalability, flexibility and robust security, among others. And while the thought of hosting IT offsite was once a worry for allocators, today's investors find comfort in knowing hedge fund and alternative investment firms are focusing on their investment priorities and leaving the technology decisions to the experts. 

From our perspective, the cloud is now a tried and tested infrastructure environment that is acceptable to the institutional investor community. They have become very thorough in their operational due diligence process, understanding exactly what cloud providers provide from an operational, management and security perspective. This has allowed managers to become much more comfortable at appointing a cloud provider to deliver an infrastructure that will perform well in any type of trading environment. 

Where managers need to spend their time is deciding on the best cloud provider to work with, as opposed to thinking about whether or not they should use a cloud provider in the first place.

And how exactly do emerging fund managers embark on that decision-making process? 

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund  Cloud Computing  Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Outsourcing  Infrastructure  Communications  Trends We're Seeing 

Hedge Fund Technology for Startups: Mistakes to Avoid and Guidance for Success

By Zorela Georgescu ,
Thursday, April 28th, 2016

The financial services industry is currently under tremendous pressure to meet both investor and due diligence requirements. Thus, it is increasingly important to maximize technology to meet these pressures. To conclude our six-part hedge fund launch webinar series, we spoke with Eze Castle Integration’s own managing director Vinod Paul, who shared insights about current IT challenges and demands and how today’s hedge funds can employ best practices for operational excellence.

Key Priorities for New Managers

Paul defined cybersecurity and scalability as two primary technology considerations for new managers. You must first understand your firm’s specific vulnerabilities and exposures. One of the most common mistakes new launches make, according to Paul, is assuming that they only require the basic bare minimum in terms of technology. He urges new managers to pick an IT solution with operational growth in mind -- considering the business not at the onset, but in three to five years.

Service Provider Selection Criteria

Paul continued to place emphasis on customized IT, stating that when it comes to outsourcing, it is imperative that a firm carries out proper due diligence in choosing a provider to meet the firm’s unique needs. “You want enter into a true partnership that offers open lines of communication, flexibility, and ultimately, trust and accountability,” he said. Brand and reputation, long lasting relationships with clients, and industry experience are some of criteria Paul feels are most important when selecting a service provider. “Don’t step in to it with the attitude that a current provider is good enough, for right now,” he cautioned. The service provider should not only address day-to-day operations but also anticipate potential problems down the road.

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund  Cloud Computing  Security  Hedge Fund Operations  Infrastructure  Outsourcing  Trends We're Seeing 

The Hedge Fund Real Estate Market: An Insider's View

By Zorela Georgescu,
Thursday, April 21st, 2016

During part 5 of our 6-part Hedge Fund Launch Webinar Series, we discussed the real estate frontier for startups with guest Ben Friedland, Executive Vice President at CBRE in New York, and his colleagues.
When searching for a space for your firm, “The trickiest part is the great unknown,” said Friedland, expressing perhaps the most common sentiment of new managers. “Flexibility,” he continued, “is the most important factor.” As a new manager, you must be willing to ask yourself, How is my firm going to do? Will it double in size in a year or shut down?

This uncertainty calls for careful consideration of what type of space is best suited for your firm. Friedland described four typical types of spaces:

  • Direct spaces;

  • Sublease spaces;

  • Temporary office suites; and

  • Shared spaces

Categorized under: Real Estate  Launching A Hedge Fund 

Navigating the Cyber Risk & Liability Landscape

By Zorela Georgescu,
Thursday, April 14th, 2016

In the last decade, the financial services industry has seen a dramatic increase in the number of high-profile cyber-attacks. Data breaches have risen in frequency, sophistication and risk impact. In light of this trend, emerging and established firms alike must consider measures to mitigate these growing risks. During this week’s session of our Hedge Fund Launch Webinar Series, Nicole Segal and Gamelah Palagonia of Willis Towers Watson spoke with us about how to leverage cyber and privacy liability insurance, as well as offered insight in to the evolving nature of cybercrime.

Umbrella Coverage - Cyber Insurance

“In the past two years, there’s been more talk than action,” Palagonia began. In the past, most hedge funds didn’t feel like they had exposure because they weren’t collecting personally identifiable information (PII) or credit card information. Now, with the threat of ransomware and damage to digital assets looming, hedge funds are increasingly interested in cyber insurance. Our guests acknowledged, however, that new SEC guidelines have also played a large role in shaping how firms consider cyber insurance. “There was a shift at the SEC level from a compliance-based to risk-based approach,” said Palagonia. “You can’t just wait until an event happens to remediate it.”

Segal noted that despite increased regulatory exposure, the general insurance market for hedge funds has reacted quite favorably. In the past two or three years, many insurance companies have entered the marketplace for underwriting for hedge funds on both the property and casualty side. Rates are dropping dramatically, and coverage terms are relatively favorable at this point in time. For example, many of the required coverages for startups come in business packages at oftentimes reasonable costs. Some of this must-have coverage typically includes property & casualty, general liability and worker’s compensation.

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund 

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