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Thriving in the Hedge Fund Startup Market: Three Considerations for Emerging Managers

By Katie Sloane,
Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

It’s no surprise that starting a hedge fund is no easy feat. In an increasingly competitive landscape challenged with evolving investor and regulatory demands, progressive technology and mounting cyber threats, emerging managers can become overwhelmed at the winding path that lay before them. Still, hundreds of emerging managers attempt launching every year due to the prospective monetary and fundamental rewards.

What sets apart successful startups from those that fail? In today’s post we will cover a few essential areas startupreneurs should consider during their launch journey.

Invest in People

Your greatest assets walk out of the door every day: Your team. Every hedge fund startup is backed by people, and the more dynamic and versatile this team is, the greater chance the firm has of achieving and sustaining a successful future. Why? Since capital is limited during the development phase, selecting people with skill sets in multiple arears is essential. Additionally, employees are ambassadors for your firm, and thus, critical to attracting investors.

Categorized under: Launching A Hedge Fund  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing 



How Cyber Security Vulnerability Assessments Work for Investment Advisers

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

The SEC and other financial regulatory bodies have increased transparency demands with regard to cybersecurity in recent years, and as such, registered investment advisers face a long list of requirements to meet on the technology and operational front. In each of its cybersecurity guidance updates, the SEC has called out the need for hedge funds and private equity firms to "indicate whether they conduct periodic risk assessments to identify cybersecurity threats, vulnerabilities and potential business consequences", and if so, who conducts them and how often. 

Risk and vulnerability assessments have not only become must-haves for financial firms due to these regulatory initiatives, but also as a result of growing investor calls for transparency. Side note: If you missed the news, Eze Castle Integration has expanded its cybersecurity consulting services to deliver comprehensive vulnerability assessments (as well as penetration testing and third party due diligence audits) across both internal and external networks. Click here to read more about Eze Vulnerability Assessments

We field a lot of questions about what exactly a security vulnerability assessment is, so we thought it best to review what such a test entails.
 
Here’s a quick overview.
 
The type of risk assessment typically associated with information technology/security is an external vulnerability assessment. Essentially, this is the process of identifying and categorizing vulnerabilities related to a system or infrastructure. Typical steps associated with a vulnerability scan or assessment include:

  • Identifying all appropriate systems, networks and infrastructures;

  • Scanning networks to assess susceptibility to external hacks and threats;

  • Classifying vulnerabilities based on severity; and

  • Making tactical recommendations around how to eliminate or remediate threats at all levels.

Categorized under: Security  Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Private Equity  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing  Infrastructure  Trends We're Seeing 



What Hedge Fund Tech Can Learn from the Delta Airlines IT Outage

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Earlier this week Delta Airlines suffered a major system outage that resulted in more than 740 flight cancellations and thousands of flight delays.

Delta’s Chief Operating Officer Gil West explained that “Monday morning a critical power control module at [Delta’s] Technology Command Center malfunctioned, causing a surge to the transformer and a loss of power. The universal power was stabilized and power was restored quickly. But when this happened, critical systems and network equipment didn’t switch over to backups. Other systems did. [As a result, Delta saw] instability in these systems.”

As with any major “uh oh” moment, there are lessons that can be learned. So let’s take a look at what hedge funds can learn from Delta’s IT mishap.

1. Outdated technology can hurt in a big way. Airlines are saddled with legacy IT systems, complicated by mergers and acquisitions requiring complex integrations. Unlike airlines however, most asset management firms are not relying on technology from 80s or 90s. But that doesn’t give firms a pass when it comes to staying current with technology.

Outdated IT systems insert instability into a firm’s operations and provide holes for cyber hackers to exploit. The reality is that outdated systems will only continue to fall behind in the race of technology, trouble shooting will take longer, future applications will fail to run, or crash the server altogether, and the cost to migrate increases concurrently as the pool of experts shrinks.

2. You can’t ignore the IT industry’s transition to cloud computing. As noted in a ZDNet article, “the big question is why in 2016 airlines are being brought down by single points of failure when cloud services offer resiliency zones, backup options, and redundancy to keep critical systems running.”

Enterprise-grade clouds deliver significant resiliency in both the hardware and data centers, with cloud infrastructures spanning geographically diverse facilities. Beyond hardware, top tier cloud providers (Eze!) have teams of senior engineers managing and monitoring the infrastructure. Additionally systems are upgraded on a regular frequency.

In the investment management industry, it is common to hear investors state they are more comfortable with fund managers utilizing a private cloud rather than keeping IT on premise. At larger funds, the prevalence of cloud-based solutions provides Chief Technology Officers (CTOs) the opportunity to execute more strategic technology initiatives and focus on risk mitigation.

 

Categorized under: Cloud Computing  Hedge Fund Insiders  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing 



Business Continuity Tip for Investment Management: Communication is Vital

By Eze Castle Integration,
Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

There's a lot to learn about business continuity planning for investment managers. To help, you might want to watch our recent webinar highlighting the SEC's June 2016 business continuity guidance update. You can watch the full webinar replay here. The SEC not only highlights the importance of being able to access critical systems and applications during a disruption, but also the importance of effective communication. 

Employee communication during a disaster is keyIt is vital to communicate with your employees about the procedures of your business continuity plan before, during and after an incident. By doing so, you set the wheels in motion by creating the guidelines for the firm’s recovery.

Effective communication should include, but not be limited to:

  1. Accounting for employees;

  2. Setting workload expectations; and

  3. Providing employees with recovery status updates.

Let’s take a deeper look into those strategies.

Categorized under: Business Continuity Planning  Launching A Hedge Fund  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing 



Employee Termination Checklist for IT: An Investment Firm’s Starting Place

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Thursday, August 4th, 2016

Whether it is your summer interns heading back to school or a full-time employee moving on, an investment firm must have a detailed employee termination checklist for information technology (IT) that is diligently followed.

But what are the key items that must be on your employee termination checklist?

Here’s An Employee Termination Checklist Foundation:

  • Contact IT Department or IT Provider to terminate or change network or application logins 

  • Ensure subscriptions are either cancelled or changed

  • Collect employee equipment such as laptops, monitors, mobile devices, etc.

  • Ensure employee has documented transition procedures

  • Reset user password and disabled account

Categorized under: Security  Launching A Hedge Fund  Hedge Fund Operations  Business Continuity Planning 



The Threat Within: Mitigating insider risk

By Katie Sloane,
Thursday, July 28th, 2016

The following article first appeared in Hedgeweek's special report: Cybersecurity for Fund Managers 2016.

Mitigating insider risk is one of the biggest challenges that organisations face when it comes to remaining cyber secure.

One thing we've seen a lot of with clients is their need for consulting support," says Mark Coriaty (pictured), Senior Vice President Strategy & Partnerships, Eze Castle Integration. "They don't necessarily have the biggest IT teams and/or might have been more focused on the engineering side than the cyber side. Consequently, they are spending more time learning about the business, as opposed to just putting a solution in place.Mark Coriaty Headshot

"Cybersecurity comes down to operational and procedural policies as well as employee training, which is by far one of the biggest threats to any firm."

Many of the reasons for internal breaches come down purely to human error, but on occasion it may be the actions of a rogue employee that lead to data misappropriation. To limit the impact, fund managers can put in place permission controls as a way to manage their policies and procedures, this might allow them to shut off a USB drive, protect different file sets on the back-end etc.

"It is important for whomever is managing the overall IT infrastructure to ensure that people only have access to data that they need for their day-to-day responsibilities, and block them from accessing data in other parts of the organisation," says Coriaty, adding that employee training has to be an ongoing process. "For larger firms who hire new employees regularly, managing the process of training them is crucial to maintaining good security. Most hackers target smaller investment managers not to collect credit card numbers, or investor details, but for extortion purposes using the likes of CryptoLocker to pay ransoms.

Categorized under: Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation 



Five Takeaways from the SEC’s 2016 Business Continuity Guidance Update

By Katelyn Orrok,
Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Last month, the SEC issued a guidance update for registered advisers regarding how funds (and their service providers) plan for potential business disruptions. Eze Castle Integration’s Certified BCP Planners have reviewed the guidance and recently shared their thoughts on how hedge funds and private equity firms can meet the SEC’s growing expectations and standards with regard to business continuity practices.

Read on for five takeaways from the SEC’s business continuity guidance update or scroll down to watch our full, 30-minute webinar replay.

Include all All Key Components of Your Firm

When writing a BCP, firms undoubtedly remember to create plans for their physical office facilities and technology systems, but it is important that you don’t overlook other important components that drive the well-being of your firm. This includes data/colocation centers, employees, activities and dependencies on critical third parties. You could face an array of issues affecting one or more factors within your firm, so it is important to implement a business continuity plan that not only addresses potential risks but also outlines comprehensive protection methods. 

A BCP is a Living Document

Internal participation is a fundamental driver for a successful BCP. From senior management executives to representatives from Human Resources and Compliance, internal business continuity contributors need to be informed of and up-to-date on policies and procedures. The BCP should also take into consideration the ideas, recommendations and changes brought forward from other departments within the firm.

Remember: A business continuity plan is dynamic, therefore changes and challenges faced need to be transparent with all parts of the company. 

Categorized under: Business Continuity Planning  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing  Trends We're Seeing 



For start-ups: Four pillars of cyber security defence

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, July 14th, 2016

The following article was written by Dean Hill, Executive Director, Eze Castle Integration and first appeared on Hedgeweek as part of their special report: A Guide to Setting up an Alternative Investment Fund in Europe. 
Dean Hill, Eze Castle Integration

There is no shortage of threats to financial services firms, and the list of requirements from investors and regulators alike is growing at a rapid pace. As a startup, it's important to demonstrate to investors that you take your business seriously, hence, investments in operational excellence are required. On the cybersecurity front, that means leveraging technology infrastructure with robust, security-rich features including intrusion detection and ongoing traffic monitoring, regular vulnerability assessments and next-generation software, firewalls and patches to keep hackers out and firm assets secure.

But beyond technology safeguards, today's successful financial firms require the wherewithal to implement comprehensive cybersecurity programmes – whether you're a seasoned firm or embarking on your first investment venture. The most effective cyber programmes will focus on four critical administrative areas: (1) developing comprehensive security policies and plans to prevent external cyber-attacks or internal breaches, (2) training firm employees on said policies and current cyber threats, (3) cultivating a culture of security awareness from Management down, and (4) managing an effective risk programme via external vendor oversight. 

Plan: True cybersecurity defence starts with proper planning. To start, funds need to develop written information security plans – comprehensive documentation of the firm's corporate security initiatives. This should include technical and administrative safeguards being employed to secure confidential data. In the development stage, firms will need to identify systems and plans currently being used, technical procedures and systems in effect, employee access controls relative to confidential data as well as user responsibilities for both prior to and in the event of a data breach. 

Categorized under: Security  Launching A Hedge Fund  Private Equity  Hedge Fund Operations  Outsourcing  Infrastructure  Trends We're Seeing 



SSAE 16, SOC1, SOC2: Understanding Audit Terminology

By Eze Castle Integration,
Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

SOC AuditWhen assessing technology options and evaluating outsourced IT providers, there are a number of questions hedge fund managers should be asking in order to make the best decision for their firms.
 
As we talk with investment managers – especially those whose firms are considering a move to the cloud – we’re hearing many of these great questions on an increasingly regular basis. One particular area where there tends to be some confusion, however, is the topic of audit standards which govern service organizations and the data centers they manage on behalf of client firms. To help you navigate through the evaluation process, we’ve pulled together a guide to understanding audit terminology and industry standards.

Categorized under: Trends We're Seeing  Cloud Computing  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing 



Optimizing Hedge Fund Operations, Staffing and Technology

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, June 30th, 2016

There is a lot of change happening across the investment management industry, as hedge funds and alternative firms deal with uncertain markets, regulatory pressure and a fiercely competitive landscape. As a result, hedge funds are becoming smarter and thriftier. Budgets are tightening, and with increased demands from investors and regulators, funds now face greater challenges than ever before.

A key challenge in today’s landscape is weighing cost versus benefit when it comes to maintaining internal hedge fund operations and technology. Back in the aftermath of the 2008 economic crisis, operational cuts were made across personnel, infrastructure and everywhere in between. Funds rebounded in recent years, but with global challenges (e.g. Brexit) looming and a tough economic market for investments, fund managers are once again looking to maximize efficiency and operations across the organization. 

How does a firm go about maintaining their existing levels of performance and efficiency while also trimming costs and anticipating changes that cannot yet be defined? Determining what a fund should be evaluating is half the battle; developing an actionable game plan and executing it is the hard part. 

Hedge Fund Staffing

People are the foundation of a company no matter what the size. Ironically, managing the day-to-day operations are not tasks that investment professionals typically have experience with or have much interest in. In order to create a performance-driven hedge fund operating staff, fund managers should identify and define the roles and responsibilities of each staff member.

Setting individual and group goals and objectives, as well as a clear method for achieving these, is one of the most important things a fund can do in order to maintain an effective, scalable staff. If a hedge fund does not have a sound staffing and operating model, managers may find that certain operational tasks are not being fulfilled, which could lead to portfolio or compliance risk.

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Operations  Outsourcing  Trends We're Seeing 



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