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Five Ways to Impress Hedge Fund Investors at Your Next Due Diligence Meeting

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Operational due diligence meetings have become impactful moments for hedge funds to impress both current and potential investors. Firms have the ability to answer questions, alleviate fears and market themselves in a one-on-one setting that affords more opportunity than a completed due diligence questionnaire and an up-to-date performance sheet.
 
But how can today’s hedge funds truly set themselves apart and impress investors during these ODD meetings? Here are five ways:

1. Demonstrate your knowledge of and commitment to regulatory compliance.

Increasing regulatory oversight of investment firms has been a consistent trend over the course of the last few years, and it can be a challenge for hedge funds to keep abreast of changing legislation and regulator expectations. Disclosure and reporting requirements under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, record-keeping requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act, and growing cybersecurity recommendations as part of the SEC’s ongoing inquiry are just a few of the initiatives to keep track of. But demonstrating to investors that your firm has knowledge of these regulations and takes them seriously will serve you well.
 
Whether your firm is compliant to the SEC, FINRA, NFA, CFTC, FCA – phew! – or another regulatory body, it’s imperative that you take the time to fully understand your firm’s legislative requirements and, in writing, show investors your level of preparedness. For example, if you’re a registered investment adviser with the SEC, are you aware of the proposed rule that would require firms to implement business continuity and transition plans? Have you compiled a document that outlines the SEC’s 28 points identified in its cybersecurity risk alert? Coming to your next investor due diligence meetings with this knowledge and the appropriate documentation will demonstrate that you take regulatory compliance seriously and are equipped to comply with the necessary requirements facing your organization. 

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Security  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Trends We're Seeing 



What’s the Difference Between Next-Generation Firewalls and Traditional Firewalls?

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Tuesday, November 8th, 2016

Due to changes in the cyber security landscape, traditional firewalls on the port level are no longer effective at managing traffic. Malicious traffic has the capacity to enter any open port, which provides great risk to firm security. Next-generation firewalls work further than port-based firewalls by adding application inspection and intrusion prevention. Next generation firewalls have the ability to scan traffic as it enters and leaves the network, therefore stopping potential threats.
 
Employee Security Dos and Don'ts eBookEze Castle Integration is increasingly implementing Palo Alto next-gen firewalls for our hedge fund and alternative investment firm clients. Palo Alto is not only a next generation firewall but it is also the market leader based upon ratings, support, pricing and overall performance. A Palo Alto firewall has the ability to detect what traffic is doing and immediately stop threats from spreading by distributing protection.
 
Unknown traffic is analyzed by Palo Alto Wildfire, where new threats are identified and protections are simultaneously developed. Upon the discovery of an unknown threat, the threat is not only blocked but updates are sent to all global subscribers within five minutes to be able to stop them from spreading. Due to this feature each threat and its variants are blocked without having to go through the analysis process again. Through Wildfire information is also fed through a filter which allows for automatic blocking of any correlated threats.
 
Older port-based models do not detect what traffic is doing, therefore allowing threats to port hop until they find an open port in which they can enter. Viruses are not port specific and can therefore utilize any port. Without analyzing what traffic is doing threats can easily bypass a port-based model. 
 
The current threat landscape is such that security threats are more likely to arise from within your network as opposed to external sources. Internal users opening malicious emails or becoming victims of phishing schemes are now preferred methods for attackers. The next generation capabilities of the Palo Alto firewalls allow for deep application level inspection to detect and thwart these threats from opening backdoors to your network.

Additional Advantages of Next Generation Firewalls 

  • All-in-one functionality: Next-generation firewalls bundle traditional firewall functionality with intrusion prevention, antivirus and protocol filtering. 

Categorized under: Security  Private Equity  Hedge Fund Operations  Outsourcing  Infrastructure  Software  Trends We're Seeing 



Point-Counterpoint: Examining C-Level Perspectives on Hedge Fund Outsourcing

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

On occasion, hedge fund C-level execs don’t see eye to eye. It’s inevitable. One such topic of occasional discord is outsourced IT. Chief technology officers (CTOs), for example, are immersed in every level of technology, from applications to security to disaster recovery, and they have a vested interest in concerns from user experience to business continuity and beyond.
 
Meanwhile, chief financial officers (CFOs) must focus on the bottom line, factoring in the cost-benefit of new technologies and projects. Elsewhere in the C-suite, the chief operating officer (COO) is looking at opportunity costs and asking key questions including if the CTO is managing day-to-day IT “plumbing,” which strategic projects are getting pushed aside?
 
Following is an excerpt from a whitepaper we recently published looking at various C-level perspectives on IT outsourcing – including where certain executives may differ on its value, where those same executives can agree, and ultimately why outsourcing IT and using the cloud sets alternative investment firms up for success. DOWNLOAD THE FULL PAPER HERE.

The cloud point-counterpoint

Based on investor comfort, the SEC’s increased scrutiny of cybersecurity practices and the impact of legislation like the Dodd-Frank Act, moving to private cloud services seems like a no-brainer. The cloud creates a far more cost-efficient and effective way for alternative investment firms to improve security and manage day-to-day IT demands. So why the conflict between CFOs/COOs and CTOs?
 
Total Control Comes with Risks
One reason for the conflict is that CTOs want to retain control, and understandably so. Outsourced security measures may seem opaque compared to the control they impart – it is tempting to believe that no third party could be as invested in system resiliency (i.e. disaster recovery) and security as the firm itself.
 
The reality is that most CTOs are so tasked for time and money that they cannot maintain complete control over their environments. The burden of ensuring continuous, reliable and secure operations is difficult even for large enterprises that have vast time and budgets and potentially unsurmountable for smaller teams. Often only the largest firms can adequately invest in and manage the layers of security necessary to defend against growing cybersecurity threats.
 
In seeking to retain control, CTOs are limiting their options. Embracing the idea of cloud-based services expands the CTO’s team, provides greater redundancies and enables more cost efficiencies. Most importantly, it lets the CTO focus on priority IT projects that enhance and improve the company’s bottom line. 
 
CTO’s Role is Evolving
Procuring, maintaining, testing and upgrading adequate technology on-premise is out of reach for most alternative investment firms. It is also becoming an antiquated strategy. Today’s progressive CTOs are increasingly drawing on cloud technology to create agile firms that can quickly deliver the applications users require.
 
CFOs/COOs must recognize the valuable business knowledge and insights the CTO can insert into functions including risk management, product development, operations and innovation. CTOs must understand where they can deliver functional results and utilize the cloud as an IT-enabler for the firm.
 
As the CTO’s role evolves, so does the entire IT team. Too often in-house IT teams are allocating valuable time to reacting to IT issues and troubleshooting rather than proactively solving user issues or addressing regulatory mandates.
 
Outsourcing Has a Track Record
CFOs and COOs have the advantage of positive experiences with outsourcing. Many have used third-party providers for functions like payroll, accounting or even hiring, so it’s not surprising that they tend to be more comfortable with bringing in cloud service providers to deliver more efficiencies and dedicate focus to revenue-producing activities.

Categorized under: Outsourcing  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing 



Hedge Fund Risk Management: Establishing Controls and Governance (Video)

By Katelyn Orrok,
Tuesday, October 25th, 2016

To wrap up and round out our 6-week Risk Outlook Webinar Series, we spoke with John Cotronis, Executive Director at JP Morgan, about hedge fund risk management and governance. Specifically, he addressed the following questions:

  • What have you observed in recent years in terms of changes affecting hedge funds – particularly at the startup phase?

  • Have you noticed a marked shift in the importance managers are placing on risk?

  • Do the firms you typically engage with have staff on hand to manage risk – compliance officers, etc.?

  • In terms of corporate governance, where do you see investment firms excelling when it comes to implementing risk management controls and also fostering a culture of risk management across the firm?

  • Let’s talk a little bit about counterparty risk. What kind of criteria are you looking for that indicates to you a provider has the right risk management framework and best practice structure to support your clients?

  • A lot has gotten tougher for firms, particularly on the investment side with capital raising, also with regulatory reporting, etc. What areas of operations do you think have gotten easier for hedge funds over the years?

  • What is your assessment of outsourcing risk – is it higher or lower than managing various functions in-house?

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Operations  Cloud Computing  Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing  Trends We're Seeing  Videos And Infographics 



Regulatory Risk for Investment Advisers: Guidance, Enforcement and Compliance

By Katelyn Orrok,
Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

As our Risk Outlook Series continues, we recently spoke with John Araneo, Partner at Cole-Frieman & Mallon LLP in New York, about many of the regulatory risks facing hedge funds today, including compliance, expense allocations and cybersecurity. Continue reading for a brief synopsis or scroll down to watch our webinar replay below. 

How would you describe the current regulatory climate for fund managers and investment advisers?

For hedge fund managers and investment advisers, the regulatory expectations have never been higher. Looking ahead to 2017, managers and advisers should expect the challenge of having to navigate potentially seismic regulatory changes - each of which has the potential to complicate business practices and add to the cost and complexity of compliance.

How should clients prepare to react to these changes?

It’s a top-down approach that all comes down to compliance. A culture of compliance is no longer a lofty goal or a cliché; it is now a regulatory expectation. There needs to be a robust compliance program, actual implementation, and accountability. Clients should be prepared and able to effectively manage the SEC examinations. Managers need to take time to understand regulatory priorities and expectations before an exam.

What is the current regulatory regime's appetite for outsourcing the compliance function?

There is no requirement for firms to employ a full-time person to service compliance. However, the worries about outsourcing certain functions, particularly the compliance officer function, may lead to weakened compliance culture. The opportunity of outsourcing creates a gap between the compliance function and the operations, decision makers and day-to-day activities. Outsourcing can be effective and sufficient, but management needs to resist setting it and forgetting it.

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Regulation  Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing  Videos And Infographics 



Addressing Hedge Fund Audit Risk: Insights from KPMG

By Katelyn Orrok,
Thursday, October 13th, 2016

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing 



20 Cybersecurity Dos and Don'ts Your Employees Should Follow

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

IT security best practices ebookWith October being cybersecurity awareness month it is an important time to ensure your firm and employees are aware of and using best practices, and security policies and procedures. Risk mitigation is needed to protect both the firm and its employees from savvy hackers and attacks. Data breaches continue to wreak havoc on businesses, and the cost is continuously rising. According to the Ponemon Institute, the total average cost of a data breach is now $4 million, up from $3.8 million in 2015. Hackers have everything to gain while your firm bears reputational and operational harm.

While companywide policies should reflect long-range expectations and corporate best practices, they should also include tactical recommendations that employees can follow to ensure they are complying with the company’s overall risk strategy. To get started here are just a few pieces of advice we offer our investment firm clients and remember to not only inform employees on what to do, but also what not to do.

 

Categorized under: Security  Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Infrastructure  Communications  Business Continuity Planning  Trends We're Seeing 



Do You Have What It Takes to Fight Malware? #CyberAware

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Thursday, October 6th, 2016

In honor of October being National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we’ll be bringing helpful articles on a range of topics starting with this one on understanding malware.

We’re also debuting our first interactive game, FreEze!, where your challenge is to hit malware before it hits you (à la Space Invaders). Play the game below or keep reading for more on malware -- or do both!

Play FreEze and be a Malware Fighter

 Play FreEze Malware Game

Categorized under: Security  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing  Videos And Infographics 



Five Hedge Fund Cybersecurity Risks and Struggles

By Katelyn Orrok,
Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

In Part Three of our Risk Outlook Webinar Series, Michael Corcione, Managing Director of Cordium, spoke about compliance and cybersecurity trends in the investment industry. Although cybersecurity risks and struggles can vary from firm to firm, it is important to address a number of key areas.

Continue reading for quick takeaways or scroll down to watch the 30 minute video replay.

Regulation

Good security can be achieved as firms move from reactive to proactive strategies. Firms usually start with the goal of checking the box for regulators, but they need to get beyond the 'check-the-box' exercises and test controls. The SEC’s 2015 cybersecurity guidance update provided more specific insights on cybersecurity focus areas for investment firms - governance and risk assessments, training and awareness, incident response, data loss prevention, access rights controls, and vendor risk management. Hedge funds and investment firms should use this as a framework, understand how they have addressed these areas and where they need to improve. 

Leadership

A good cybersecurity program starts with the leadership team, and they need to set the tone from the top down. This way everybody understands the impact of risk and its effects on the firm. Leaders should acknowledge risk, understand risk, and lead ongoing discussions firm-wide.

Categorized under: Security  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing  Videos And Infographics 



Six Questions to Ask About Your Investment Firm's Cybersecurity Risk

By Katelyn Orrok,
Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

During Part 2 of our Risk Outlook Webinar Series we spoke with Eze Castle Integration Director Dan Long about how investment firms should address evolving cybersecurity risks, third party service provider oversight and employee training and education. Many of the points Dan addressed highlight questions hedge funds and private equity firms should be asking themselves.

Read on or scroll to the bottom to watch the full, 30-minute replay.

What is our commitment to cybersecurity and what is our outlook on the future?

Regulators and investors continue to ask more questions about cybersecurity because they want to know that firms are effectively mitigating risk. To meet these growing expectations, firms must demonstrate that you take cybersecurity risk seriously and have implemented sound systems, policies and procedures to combat those risks. As the threat landscape and technology continue to evolve, investment management firms need to evolve accordingly and develop better ways to counteract threats. Firms don’t necessarily need to implement every available security technology, but they should be keenly aware of their options and have a plan to effectively mitigate as much risk as possible.

How are we addressing third party risk and oversight?

Investment management firms often rely on third party vendors to obtain functionality or capabilities that they need, want or can’t afford to produce on their own. But moving functions out of the firm's control can present challenges. With any outsourced function, the firm inherently takes on additional risks at the hands of the third party. But it's critical for investment managers to limit those risks through sufficient due diligence. To combat vendor risk, financial firms need to maintain strict oversight of all third party relationships and investigate security practices and protocols, particularly for those vendors who have access to the firm's confidential information. An outsourced vendor should be providing the same level of security (or better!) as your firm would if the function was under in-house control.

Categorized under: Security  Private Equity  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Outsourcing  Business Continuity Planning  Videos And Infographics 



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