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Four Signs It's Time to Break up with Your IT Provider

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Broken HeartIn any relationship, when things are good, they’re usually pretty good. And when things are bad, sometimes they are really bad. There may come a point when you need to evaluate whether you’re still a good fit together.
 
Just like with a romantic relationship, your firm’s connection to a service provider (especially an infrastructure/cloud provider you rely on daily) should be strong enough to withstand a few hiccups and healthy enough to warrant open communication at all times. In some cases, it might be clear that you’re in a good place and moving forward together, but sometimes there are sure signs it’s time to call it quits.
 
Here are a few of those signs:

1. Your provider’s service levels are not up to snuff.

Maybe you recently experienced a major service outage or find that you not-so-conveniently have to work around confusing and interrupting maintenance schedules during work hours. You’re constantly frustrated and don’t feel like you are receiving the level of support that was agreed to – both verbally and as part of your Service Level Agreement (SLA).

Your SLA should clearly indicate the uptime standard (e.g. 99.995% availability) as well as repercussions to any breaches in the contract (for example, service credits) and associated RPOs if disaster recovery is involved

Categorized under: Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Help Desk  Infrastructure  Communications  Outsourcing  Trends We're Seeing 



51 Hedge Fund IT Due Diligence Questions You Can Expect From Investors

By Mary Beth Hamilton,
Thursday, October 9th, 2014

On our recent Hedge Fund Marketing and Due Diligence webinar we looked at how the hedge fund investor due diligence process is evolving especially in terms of scrutiny on technology processes and security safeguards. 

The reality is that investors have a greater understanding of technology, are asking more probing questions and care about the responses they receive.  We’ve even heard investors say that deficiencies in IT infrastructure and security contributed to the decisions to redeem from or not invest in a fund.

So at Eze Castle Integration we regularly assist our hedge fund clients in completing the IT portions of investor due diligence questionnaires. The wording of questions varies but here is a handy list of 51 common IT due diligence questions we see.

Organization

  1. Provide an organization chart for the Company, its affiliates and key personnel.

  2. Provide the physical address and general contact information for each of the Company’s office locations.

  3. Provide the name and contact information of the Company employee(s) assigned to the client’s account(s).

  4. Provide a list of compliance personnel, their roles and qualifications, the date of his/her appointment and position within the Company’s organizational structure.

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Launching A Hedge Fund  Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Security  Hedge Fund Operations  Trends We're Seeing 



19 Tips to Prepare for a Power Outage, Part 2: Individuals and Families

By Matt Donahue, Business Continuity Analyst,
Thursday, August 28th, 2014

In Part One of Tips to Prepare Your Investment Firm for a Power Outage, we shared 21 key steps from one of Eze Castle Integration's Business Continuity Experts, Matt Donahue, which can help firms to develop a Business Continuity Plan (BCP).

In Part Two, we discuss measures that individuals and families should take to prepare for a power outage or blackout.

19 Tips to Prepare You and Your Family

During an outage, it pays to have yourself and your family prepared.  Take time and talk to your family about outages and what to do when they happen.  Consider impaired or elderly family members and neighbors that may need assistance during an outage.  Do research on your town's or city's emergency preparedness plans. Learn how they will identify shelters, warming/cooling stations, and announce their opening.

Categorized under: Business Continuity Planning  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Communications  Software 



21 Tips to Prepare Your Investment Firm for a Power Outage

By Matt Donahue, Business Continuity Analyst,
Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Extended power outages and blackouts have the potential to impact not only businesses but also our personal lives. Without electrical power, some business functions may cease entirely, resulting in the loss of valuable data and production time.  

With Hurricane Season here and Tropical Storm Cristobal brewing in the Atlantic, we are running a two part series contributed by one of our Business Continuity Experts here at Eze Castle Integration – Matt Donahue.

In today’s article Matt looks at the steps or actions investment firms and other businesses can follow in order to mitigate, prepare, respond, and recover from an extended outage or blackout. Then Thursday’s article will focus on these same topics but for individuals.

Preparing for Power Outage21 Tips to Prepare Your Business

During an outage, investment firms risk data losses, experience logistical issues and experience unfavorable or impossible working conditions. Heavy reliance on technology items, IT systems and software can put businesses in a difficult situation during an outage, especially if they have not pre-planned or completed a Business Continuity Plan (BCP).  Other mitigation activities such as purchasing alternative or back up power sources such as batteries or generators are good ways to ensure power for essential items.

Here are some other helpful steps and precautions investment firms should consider.

Categorized under: Business Continuity Planning  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Communications  Software 



Assessing Your Firm's Attitude Toward Security: What's Your Type?

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, August 21st, 2014

If there’s one thing we’ve learned over the years when it comes to security, it’s that there’s a whole lot more to creating a secure hedge fund (or any business for that matter) than robust technology. Before identifying infrastructure components and implementing operational policies, a firm must first be clear on what its attitude is toward security. This attitude will filter through the company from the top down, and will therefore dictate how employees and the business as a whole operate on a daily basis.Security
 
To give you a clearer understanding of what we mean, we’ve created three security profiles that cover a wide spectrum in terms of security attitudes and practices.

Under the Radar: Low Security

If you’re attitude toward security is low, odds are you’re barely scraping the surface in terms of what practices and policies you should be employing to maintain proper security firm-wide. You likely rely on quick fixes to solve problems instead of looking at the bigger picture and thinking strategically about how security can both benefit and protect your business. You’ve employed minimal preparedness efforts and could be in for a difficult task if faced with a serious security incident. You probably take a “it won’t happen to me” attitude and don’t take security seriously enough – a stance that could endanger your firm in the long term.

Categorized under: Security  Launching A Hedge Fund  Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Infrastructure  Communications  Outsourcing  Business Continuity Planning  Trends We're Seeing  Videos And Infographics 



Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS): Technology Risk Management Guidelines Overview

By Kulvinder Gill,
Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

Monetary Authorirty of SingaporeThe last five years has seen an increase in reliance on technology among financial institutions. IT outsourcing has become more attractive to the financial services industry - but against the backdrop of increased reliance on complex IT systems and operations is the heightened risk of cyber-attacks and system disruptions.

In June 2013, the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) issued the Technology Risk Management Guideline (TRMG), which addresses existing and emerging technology risks within financial institutions.   
 
The objective of the TRMG is for financial firms to establish a sound and robust technology risk management framework, strengthen system security, reliability, resiliency, recoverability and deploy strong authentication to protect customer data and systems.

In today’s blog article we will take a look at some of the key guidelines covered in the guide:

Categorized under: Hedge Fund Regulation  Disaster Recovery  Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Infrastructure  Outsourcing  Business Continuity Planning 



Cloud Computing: The Growing Competitive Advantage for Hedge Funds

By Katie Sloane,
Thursday, July 31st, 2014

The competition amongst firms in the financial services industry is ever burgeoning, and in order to achieve differentiation, it is imperative for firms to create and maintain robust, manageable, scalable and reliable technology infrastructures. Increasingly, we’re seeing more than just emerging managers opting for a cloud solution and established hedge funds and alternative investment firms shifting gears from traditional on-premise IT infrastructures to cloud services.Why the Billion Dollar Club is going Cloud
 
If you missed our webinar yesterday on Why the Billion Dollar Club is Going Cloud, read our recap below or scroll down to watch the full webinar replay, featuring Eze Castle’s Managing Directors Bob Guilbert and Vinod Paul.

The Business Case for the Cloud: Why Established Firms are Making the Move

Across the industry, established firms that have been in business for several years are moving away from physical infrastructures and adopting the cloud. Traditionally, investment firms would allocate substantial capital budgets to build on-premise Communication (Comm.) Rooms. These cost-intensive infrastructures can take months to build out, and specific expenses can vary depending on a firm’s unique needs. For example, at minimum, investment firms require file services, email capabilities, mobility services and remote connectivity, as well as disaster recovery and compliance. Beyond those, many firms also require systems and applications such as order management systems (OMS), customer relationship management tools (CRM), and portfolio management or accounting packages.

Categorized under: Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Security  Hedge Fund Due Diligence  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Infrastructure  Communications  Outsourcing  Trends We're Seeing  Videos And Infographics 



Data Destruction Basics: Why Deleting Your Hedge Fund Data Isn't Enough

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Destroyed Hard DriveYour hedge fund's information security plan likely includes details on where information is stored, how it is accessed and who it is accessible to. But a critical component of this plan often overlooked is how and why data is destroyed when it is no longer needed. Including data destruction procedures in your WISP or as a separate document is vital to ensuring your firm’s sensitive data and intellectual property does not fall into the hands of the wrong people. Unfortunately, in today’s technology-driven, cyber-aware environment, simply hitting the delete key is not enough.
 
There are a few different scenarios that warrant secure data destruction maneuvers:

Your methods and policies for secure destruction may vary according to the above scenarios, or they may be standard across the firm. Your hedge fund should also consider if there are any regulatory implications. Do you need to maintain/archive data for a prescribed period of time in order to comply with state, federal or other compliance or auditing standards?
 
In any case, you’ll want to consider a variety of methods in the beginning to ensure your firm’s confidential data (e.g. investment portfolio, investor contact information, etc.) is thoroughly destroyed, preventing unwanted breaches or thefts.

Categorized under: Security  Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Hedge Fund Regulation  Infrastructure  Trends We're Seeing 



BCP Testing Outside the Conference Room: Hello, Real World

By Matt Donahue,
Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Business Continuity StatisticWhen most people envision Business Continuity Planning (BCP) and testing, they conjure up images of conference rooms, hardcopy documents, projectors and key personnel. But the real world is a different reality.

In recent memory, there have been many situations that have disrupted businesses - be it by natural disaster or as a result of human interference. In either event, people need to be able to reestablish essential business functions, communicate, and make decisions as quickly and easily as possible. 

Although many organizations do an annual BCP review, the big question is whether they truly test the process, ease of accessibility, and the time it takes an organization/leadership group to go from unsure about the situation to confidently executing a thoughtful game plan.

What can make a considerable difference in terms of functionality and familiarity with the plans and recovery procedures is to practice -- not only verbally in the conference room setting, but also by taking time to troubleshoot and brainstorm to determine what works and what may need a second look. There is a lot that can be learned from being unplugged and “kicked” out of the conference room and asked to assume a role outside of the comfort zone. This can be done simply by taking away some of the accepted norms during a test. The following scenario illustrates issues that arise when the accepted norms are chipped away.

Categorized under: Business Continuity Planning  Disaster Recovery  Security  Hedge Fund Operations  Communications 



IT Security Dos and Don'ts to Live By

By Kaleigh Alessandro,
Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

We spend a lot of time educating our clients about security best practices and encouraging them to implement comprehensive security policies and procedures to mitigate risk and protect both the firm and its employees. And for good reason. Just today, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman released a report stating data breaches across the state more than tripled from 2006 to 2013 and cost businesses more than $1.37 billion last year alone.

While companywide policies should reflect long-range expectations and corporate best practices, they should also include tactical recommendations that employees can follow to ensure they are complying with the company’s overall risk strategy. In addition to providing employees with security best practices they should follow, don’t forget to also include a list of actions they should not. Here are just a few pieces of advice we regularly offer our investment firm clients:

DO:

  • Lock your computer and mobile phone(s) when you leave your desk and/or office

  • Use care when entering passwords in front of others

  • Create and maintain strong passwords and change them every 60-90 days (We recommend a combination of lowercase & uppercase letters and special characters)

Categorized under: Security  Cloud Computing  Disaster Recovery  Hedge Fund Operations  Infrastructure  Communications  Business Continuity Planning  Trends We're Seeing 



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